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Posts Tagged ‘gratitude’

Ever found yourself (or as a caregiver for your spouse, mom or dad) sitting across from a doctor and feeling like they’re not hearing you? At all?

Most of us pine for the days when we had home town doc who delivered us, knows everything about us–and cared that we stay alive.

Not that most ever had that–but it sure sounds good, doesn’t it?

As a caregiver to my mom who had Parkinson’s, heart disease, and Alzheimer’s, trust me, I’ve spent a whole lott of time in doctor’s offices.

I did a little research on-line to find out various ways to find a good doctor, and here’s what I uncovered.

What to look for in a good doctor:

  • You can’t beat a recommendation from someone you know–a friend or co-worker.
  • Make sure they’re board certified in their field. This is crucial because it can be deceptive.
  • Visit the doctor’s office before making your appointment. Look around–is the staff fussy? Do they look miserable? Time how long it takes for a person to be seen. Ask the staff how long they’ve worked for the doctor, if they can tell you a little about him or her, or how long the doctor spends with each patient and see how you’re treated. If you hear alarm bells go off in your head, then keep looking.
  • Get a doctor you like to recommend a doctor they like (if you’re looking for a specialist or in another field) because good doctors tend to hang out (aka play golf) with other good doctors.
  • Check out some online sites that review credentials, awards and distinctions, as well as a rating system for his office and staff. Ckeck out RateMDS.com, Healthgrades.com,  ChoiceTrust.com or Vitals.com.
  • Remember you’re the client. You’re paying, and you should be treated with respect. Sorry to say, but no doctor is going to spend as much time with you as you probably would like, but they should listen to you, be competent in their assessments, and know their field of medicine well.
  • If you do feel that you need to stay with this doctor (perhaps because of location, specialty, or insurance), then here are a few helpful tactics.

How to Communicate Effectively With Your Doctor and His/Her Staff:

  • Repeat over and over: I am 100% responsible for my life. (And if you’re a caregiver, then you’re also responsible for someone else’s). Don’t leave your medical issues completely in someone else’s hands, even if those hands are attached to a physician. You should know what medications you’re on, what course of treatments you’ve agreed to–at all times.
  • Chat with the staff and get to know them. Bribe them with a tin of chocolate popcorn or stop by near a holiday with a gift card to a local restaurant or coffee p. Hey, it’s hard to resist someone who takes an interest in you, and that’s exactly what you’re doing–remember the old Golden Rule? Still applies. Ask about the picture of their kids, and use their name when you’re talking with them. This is just being considerate, but it comes in handy when you’ve got an earache and you call begging to be seen that day.
  • Start out your relationship with your doctor by shaking hands (dressed), and looking him/her in the eye. Let them know that you expect to be treated as an equal. You are–you hold a needed job in your community (or you did if you were retired), and  you are intelligent and articulate. Without being bossy or demanding, let him/her know that you’d like this to be a warm and professional relationship.
  • Go to the doctor’s office in a good mood! Be a  ray of sunshine to others around you. Be on time, don’t gripe about the little things, joke around with the staff–and watch how differently you’re treated. Take your knitting or your favorite magazine and get to know the person you’re sitting next to. Life is happening everywhere–even in doctor’s offices.
  • Write your questions down and keep them brief–but make sure you go home with answers. Also write down their answers or directions. Don’t expect their directions to make sense–put it in your own words and have a clear plan of action you can follow when you leave the doctor”s office. Don’t be intimidated with medical jargon, but also let them know that they’re not talking to a pre-schooler.
  • Do your homework–go on the Internet, check out your condition and possible drugs, treatments, symptoms, and side effects. You don’t even have to mention it since some doctors find this annoying or intimidating and a few others mght applaud you for being pro-active. Either way, it’s your health at stake so you have every right to educate yourself, but know that not all Internet medicine is accurate.
  • If you don’t feel you’re being heard, then be clear. Ask a pointed question and make sure you get an answer. You have a right to know what’s going on. Start out asking in a firm and clear manner, but don’t give up. Restate the question and ask again.
  • Don’t settle for being shoved a pill if you don’t want one. Medicine has sadly become entwined with the pharmaceutical industry and we forget that there are other alternatives and compliments to drug therapy. Let them know what kind of patient you are, and state what types of treatments you’ll consider–or won’t consider.
  • Consider holistic medicine as a complement to your main physician. Have you tried accupuncture for aiding in quitting smoking? Or for arthritis? Eastern based practices are now more mainstream than ever, and many of their benefits have been documented.
  • Write down your doctor’s names, your prescriptions and dosage and keep it in your wallet at all times. If you fall or lose conciousness, it’s imperative the the EMS workers and ER staff know this information. Don’t rely on the doctor or his chart–and realize that if you see more than one doctor and they’re not aware of the other’s medications, you could potentially have some serious drug interactions.
  • Speak up if there’s error. It happens all the time. Dosages get written down incorrectly. The doctor orders another round of chemo and you don’t want it–or you can’t take that amount–or your insurance won’t pay for a particular treatment. Don’t get upset, but do speak up–remember that 100% responsible for your own life mantra I mentioned earlier.
  • Say thank you when you leave. Shake the doctor’s hands, and even if he or his staff act rushed or inconsiderate, then make it a point to show them how to be considerate. The amazing Maya Angelou said, “We teach people how to treat us.”

My last bit of advice might sound strange, but try to not have your entire life evolve around your medical conditions.

I know that there are times when it may seem like it does–and if you have cancer or Parkinson’s, or you’re the caregiver to a loved one that has Alzheimer’s, then you probably spend a lot of time at the doctor’s office, rehabilitation, physical therapy, and in the hospital. It can be exhausting and  overwhelming, but when you can take a mental or physical break–take it. It’s not healthy to live at the doctor’s office and dwell on being sick. Honestly, it won’t make you well. Follow your regimen, take your meds, do your treatments, but keep your mind on living and learning–on your family, on leaving a legacy, on your garden, your Tai Chi, and of course,  your grandchildren.

The medical community is there to care for you. As an individual or a caregiver, you have to take the initiative and draw the best out of those around you. Be responsible for yourself, have a goal, cultivate positive attitude and a spirit of gratitude   and state clearly what you want and need. You just might get it.

~Carol D. O’Dell

Author, Mothering Mother: A Daughter’s Humorous and Heartbreaking Memoir

www.mothering-mother.com

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Creating a bedtime ritual is good for the body and soul.

Parents do this for their children–read them a book, sing a song, say a prayer. Why do we ever stop?

Everything from brushing your teeth to the way you fluff your pillow gives cues to your body to begin to relax and let go. It’s a great way to ward off insomnia and over-thinking/worrying.

 

I always ask myself two questions at the end of each day:

What was the best part of my day?

What am I looking forward to tomorrow?

As I ask myself the first question, I almost always get a visual, and about 85% of the time the best part of my day had something to do with nature. Not about me achieving my goals–and believe me, I’m very goal driven. It’s not about a royalty check reflecting how many books I’ve sold or some other personal achievement (sometimes it is, but it has to be something I feel I’ve earned or dreamed about for a long time).

The first question allows me reflect upon the day.

It’s about the double-winged dragonfly that zipped past me while I was biking. Or the blue heron that stood still and let me get really close. Or the field of wild rabbits I came up on. No matter where you live–New York City or Kalamazoo, there’s more nature around you than you think. It’s there for a reason–it sustains you in so many ways.

 

Nature gets me outside myself. It connects me with all living things. It’s exquisite,  exotic, powerful, and surprising. Sometimes I relive these moments–the feel of my hair lifting off my shoulders as I bike, the buoyancy of the waves as I body surf–reliving those moments at the end of my day is living life twice.

Occasionally, it’s about an old friend that called, a recognition I’m particularly honored to receive, but more times than not–it’s not about me.

This one question has also changed my day. What will I have to tell myself at the end of the day if I don’t get outside and give opportunity for those “best parts of my day” to present themselves?

It’s heightened my awareness. I step out my front door expecting a miracle, or at the very least, a gift.  When that hummingbird appears, that deer looks me in the eye, I’m acutely aware–and grateful. I tuck in my memory like a pebble in my pocket knowing I’ll get to enjoy it again as I lay my head on my pillow.

The second question links me to the new day in front of me.

This one I heard from Dr. Phil.Now I’m not crazy about the direction he’s taken with his Jerry Springer-esque tv show, but I heard that he asks his sons this question each night so that they would end the day on a note of hope.

No matter our age or circumstance of life–we all need something to look forward to tomorrow.

Whether it’s meeting a friend for lunch or the next day’s walk, we need to go to sleep with the thought that tomorrow is waiting for us.

It doesn’t have to be big. It doesn’t have to cost money. It’s about creating a life of meaning.

Even our elders those we are caregiving need to look forward to the next day.

This again, causes us to create our days, make plans, and focus.

Create a morning ritual as well. 

List 5 things you’re grateful for before you get up.

Again, we’re talking simple.

Here’s today’s morning list for me:

I’m grateful for–

  • a bike ride (I go on one every morning)
  • my dog Rupert and his he sits nudged under my desk as I write
  • cherries that are in season–and the bowl that awaits me when I get up
  • my favorite pillow–gushy
  • my newly painted office that is lipstick red with white trim–and has a whole wall painted in chalkboard paint so I can literally write on the walls

Nothing earth shattering, but as my feet hit the ground each morning, I do what was suggested in the book, The Secret. Each step I take on my way to the bathroom–I say, “thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you.” Out loud. I

‘m smiling by the time I glance into the mirror.

This sure is better than beating myself up for saying something stupid that day, or mulling over a pile of bills, or rehasing a disagreement. There is a time to deal with those things, but that time isn’t the last thing at night or the first thing in the morning.

Protect this sacred time. Gather the best, look forward to tomorrow–

and fill your heart with gratitude.

 

I’m Carol O’Dell, and this is my blog, Mothering Mother and More, found at caroldodell.wordpress.com/

Carol is the author of Mothering Mother: A Daughter’s Humorous and Heartbreaking Memoir.

It’s a collection of stories and thoughts for families and caregivers written in real time as she cared for her mother who suffered with Alzheimer’ and Parkinson’s.

Mothering Mother is available at Amazon and can be requested at any bookstore or library.

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